Tusk Conservation Awards

Co-created in 2013, Ninety One proudly partners with Tusk on the annual Tusk Conservation Awards to celebrate the extraordinary people who work with wildlife and communities in Africa to protect the continent’s irreplaceable natural assets.
Co-created in 2013, Ninety One proudly partners with Tusk on the annual Tusk Conservation Awards to celebrate the extraordinary people who work with wildlife and communities in Africa to protect the continent’s irreplaceable natural assets.
These awards, give us a chance to celebrate extraordinary people, whose work and lives might otherwise go unnoticed outside their fields. 

“These awards which mean a great deal to me personally, play a huge part in our mission to preserve Africa’s precious wildlife for its people. It is vital that we recognise the dedication of these unsung heroes and the bravery of rangers risking their lives, day and night, on conservation’s frontline. We all owe them a huge debt of gratitude.”

Tusk's Royal Patron, HRH The Duke of Cambridge
The Awards
The Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa is awarded to an individual judged to be emerging as a leading conservationist, in recognition of their outstanding contribution to conservation and considerable success shown in their chosen field.
This year’s winner will be announced at the virtual Tusk Awards ceremony being held on Thursday, 3rd December.

The nominees this year are George Owoyesigire, Ian Stevenson and John Kamanga.



George Owoyesigire (Uganda)
Deputy Director Community Conservation Uganda Wildlife Authority
George Owoyesigire 
George has improved relations between local communities and wildlife by promoting benefit sharing; investment in wildlife enterprises, addressing human-wildlife conflict issues and promoting conservation education. He also implemented the bee keeping project, an initiative that uses bees as a deterrent against elephant crop raiding. 


"Poverty is one of the principal causes of environmental degradation, poaching and the illegal wildlife trade. Now unless people strike a balance between the cost and the benefits they won’t want to be helping wildlife. So the issue that we need to confront is promoting livelihood enterprises."


Ian Stevenson (Zambia)
Project Manager, Conservation Lower Zambezi (CLZ)
Ian Stevenson
Ian is the project manager at CLZ, combatting issues such as poaching, human wildlife conflict and illegal activity. He made CLZ the multi-faceted and holistic organisation it is today, paving the way in law enforcement, environmental education and community engagement.


"We’ve got to try to maintain those big ecosystems without all the fences, and without all the barriers and the borders. Then, I think elephants have got a very good a very good possibility of survival into the future"


John Kamanga (Kenya) 
Executive Director, South Rift Association of Land Owners (SORALO)
John Kamanga
John has dedicated his career to developing a vision for the co-existence of pastoralists and wildlife. In Kenya, where 68% of wildlife resides on community land, supporting the ability of people and wildlife to co-exist is imperative.


"Communities have been, and will continue to be, the custodians of wildlife. However, we have to give them the tools for today. We’re living in the 21st century, where things have changed, where there are different economic pressures."



To find out about previous winners of the Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa please visit the Tusk Awards Website:

Visit the Tusk Awards website


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